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SW2000 Telework Studies

2005 to 2009 Statistics – Telework Statistics – The Information Society

 

STATISTICS JUNE 06 TO JUNE 09

STATISTICS June 04 to June 06

 

Statistics 1997 to June 04    with Telework Productivity, Costs & Benefits

 

STATISTICS 2001

USA survey analysed by SW2000.

 

TELEWORK STATISTICS INDEX

 

HOME

 

 

Statistics 2005tatistics 2004; Telework Statistics 2005 and Information Society Statistics

15-Dec-04

 PATIENCE This is a 1,292KB file

 

1997 Telework Productivity, Costs & Benefits (worked example below)

 

 

 

 

 

Statistics in the EU for Dresdner Bank

http://www.noelhodson.com/index_files/futurehumour.htm#EU_map_of_stats

 

European Telework Charter 1997 Statistics

http://www.noelhodson.com/index_files/gatflystats.htm

 

Telework Charter Signatories

http://www.noelhodson.com/index_files/e_charter_map.htm

 

 

1997 AND EARLIER EUROPEAN STATISTICS

 

CONTENTS

 

 

1997 AND EARLIER EUROPEAN STATISTICS. 2

US Government Departments – Teleworkers reported in June 2004. 2

The European Union May 2004. 5

TIME IS MONEY - What you contribute to your company. 6

TIME IS MONEY - Employee Value in some UK corporations. 7

Broadband DSL penetration – April 2004. 7

From TIME Magazine 5 April 2004. 8

USA Property Survey for flexible space – 30th March 04. 8

Washington DC and Generic de-congestion – 10th March 04. 8

Spam on the Internet – 4th Feb 04. 9

Who edits the Internet? – 29th Jan 04. 10

The concrete jungle – UK roads use 1% of the land – January 04. 10

USA Internet and Broadband report January 2004. 11

USA Road Congestion report 11

Oxford Internet Institute, UK statistics issued 16th September 2003. 12

Where Work Gets Done - chart from ComputerWorld – 8th September 2003. 13

USA Office vacancy rates – sent from Gil Gordon 13th August 2003. 13

UK – Road Usage measuring Lorries, Buses & Cars. 14

European commuting in minutes. 15

From AT&T Today. 7/16/03: 15

24th June 03 - Telework Numbers Rise in the Valley. 16

Telework as a Tool for Business & Government Continuity: 16

21% increase in teleworking by USA Federal employees. 17

USA - 2003. 17

USA - 2001. 18

UK – Department of Trade and Industry Survey – Spring 2001. 18

UK 2000 Labour Force Survey. 19

Telework Cost and Benefits Worked Example. 24

Why we drive to meetings (extract from a report for the RAC). 27

An hour with your Lawyer - comparative costs of meetings. 27

 

 

US Government Departments – Teleworkers reported in June 2004.

 

 

 

US Gov Agency - June 2004.

All Employees

Eligible

All

Telewor-kers

Core Telew-orkers

Situational Teleworkers

Days

 

Core

 

TWRKS

Days

 

Sit

 

TWRKS

 

Teleworkers in DC Metro Area

Teleworkers Outside DC Metro Area

1

Agency for Int Development

2,174

1,138

167

24

143

4

1

167

0

2

Appraisal Subcommittee

7

6

3

3

0

4

0

3

0

3

Arch and Transport Barriers Compl

28

25

18

1

17

12

4

18

0

4

Forces Retirmt Home DC

603

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

Chem Safety & Hazard Invst Bd

33

31

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

Com for Pur from Blind people

29

14

4

3

1

8

4

4

0

7

Commodity Futures Trading Com

534

534

50

0

50

0

4

47

3

8

Consumer Product S Com

452

400

198

193

5

4

5

77

121

9

Corp for Nat & Community Service

585

585

34

11

23

4

5

31

3

10

Court Services and Offender S A

1,000

939

59

55

4

4

0

54

1

11

Def. Nuclear Facilities Safety Bd

98

4

4

0

4

0

5

87

7

12

Department of Agriculture

112,843

74,780

3,434

1,543

1,891

4

2

1,607

1,827

13

Department of Commerce

24,353

17,871

6,921

5,798

1,123

5

4

6,303

329

14

Department of Defense

672,902

150,037

13,879

4,360

9,519

5

3

3,803

10,076

15

Department of Education

4,754

2,707

1,374

174

1,200

12

5

755

619

16

Department of Energy

14,519

1,437

1,437

805

632

3

2

715

722

17

Dept of Health and Human Services

66,686

51,977

9,497

4,860

4,637

6

4

4,512

7,164

18

Department of Homeland Security

53,025

25,803

392

168

224

23

1

172

806

19

Dept of Housing and Urban Dev.

10,127

487

433

401

32

9

8

68

365

20

Department of Interior

81,144

62,598

2,038

635

1,403

8

4

407

1,835

21

Department of Justice

100,400

45,895

2,029

830

1,199

8

3

1,966

9,327

22

Department of Labor

16,141

15,052

5,749

4,631

1,118

16

2

2,249

3,471

23

Department of State

18,310

11,558

170

117

53

4

1

167

3

24

Department of Transportation

58,487

27,078

2,695

1,730

965

4

2

1,136

1,559

25

Department of Treasury

108,533

43,433

30,498

20,353

10,145

7

3

2,589

27,909

26

Department of Veterans Affairs

230,406

124,318

1,415

1,017

398

4

2

0

0

27

Environmental Protection Agency

18,272

17,345

4,986

4,844

142

 

 

1,913

3,073

28

Equal Employment Opportunity Com

2,583

1,933

769

566

203

0

0

441

1,492

29

Export-Import Bank of the U.S.

420

420

1

1

0

8

0

1

0

30

Farm Credit Administration

293

293

112

7

105

4

1

46

66

31

Federal Communications Com

2,049

2,049

611

361

250

5

2

521

93

32

Federal Deposit Insurance Corp

5,341

5,341

526

453

73

6

1

189

337

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

Federal Energy Reg Com

1,218

1,142

306

267

39

3

1

264

42

34

Federal Housing Finance Board

106

98

37

9

28

20

3

29

8

35

Federal Labor Relations Authority

208

130

16

13

3

4

1

5

10

36

Federal Maritime Commission

125

125

10

1

9

2

4

10

0

37

Federal Med and Con Service

290

254

118

7

111

13

2

17

101

38

Federal Retr Thrift Invest. Bd

100

3

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

39

Federal Trade Commission

1,092

800

25

18

7

6

2

25

0

40

General Services Admin

12,800

11,873

2,904

1,318

1,586

6

2

1,325

1,579

41

Holocaust Memorial Museum

400

300

55

14

41

4

2

55

0

42

Inter-American Foundation

49

49

7

5

2

9

2

7

0

43

Int Boundary and Water Com

259

69

1

0

1

0

16

0

69

44

International Trade Com

365

365

38

0

38

0

3

38

0

45

James Madison Foundation

6

6

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

46

Japan-US Friendship Com

4

3

3

3

0

12

12

3

0

47

Merit Systems Protect Bd

225

174

47

46

1

2

4

18

29

48

Nat Aeronautics and Space Admin

19,312

15,938

929

471

458

6

10

400

4,189

49

Nat Archives and Records Admin

3,117

3,117

165

58

107

9

4

1,684

1,433

50

National Council on Disability

11

11

8

1

7

2

7

11

0

51

Nat Credit Union Administration

945

160

41

15

26

2

6

56

104

52

National Endowment for the Arts

153

153

51

0

51

0

2

51

0

53

Nat Endowment for the Humanities

170

170

55

15

40

4

2

55

0

54

National Labor Relations Board

1,935

1,334

452

200

252

5

3

87

365

55

National Mediation Board

52

52

15

14

1

4

1

50

2

56

National Science Foundation

1,341

1,160

208

72

136

6

2

190

18

57

Nuclear Regulatory Commission

3,151

3,005

876

174

702

4

1

657

219

58

Nuclear Waste Technical R B

16

15

15

13

2

4

2

15

0

59

Occupational Safety & Health RC

62

55

9

6

3

2

3

5

4

60

Office of Government Ethics

78

77

6

6

0

4

0

6

0

61

Office Nat Drug Control Policy

109

109

4

2

2

15

16

4

0

62

Office of Personnel Management

3,606

2,898

1,542

1,226

316

5

2

537

1,005

63

Office of Special Counsel

98

83

14

8

6

8

3

14

0

64

Overseas Private Invstmnt Corp

205

152

39

24

15

4

2

38

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

65

Peace Corps

916

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

66

Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp

790

339

339

99

240

4

2

339

0

67

Postal Rate Commission

47

6

6

0

6

0

1

6

0

68

Railroad Retirement Board

1,132

317

119

74

45

5

2

0

119

69

Securities and Exchange Com

3,279

3,279

313

90

223

4

0

182

131

70

Selective Service System

166

166

2

2

0

2

 

2

0

71

Small Business Administration

3,138

3,120

268

122

146

7

 

97

171

72

Social Security Administration

68,743

14,649

4,375

4,101

274

6

5

741

3,634

73

Tennessee Valley Authority

13,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

74

Trade and Devlp Agency

48

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

All employees

1,749,998

Eligible

Twrks

Core T's

Sit T's

 

 

DC

Ex-DC

 

Totals

 

  751,844

  102,921

  62,438

  40,483

5

3

37,080

84,441

 

 

 

100%

14%

8%

5%

 

 

5%

11%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The European Union May 2004

 

 

 

TIME IS MONEY - What you contribute to your company

 

Telework consultants cite time saved for productive work as the largest single benefit. These two tables indicate one method of  valuing your business time – compared to sample results from public companies.

 

               

  

The contribution to the "top-line" is equally valid for people in non-profit making organisations. Most large organisations earn net profits after all costs, overheads and taxes of 5%-10%, so there is only that degree of difference when calculating the personal contribution of civil servants and charitable agencies workers to their employers’ organisations. And no employers hire and retain people who are not making a valuable contribution to the team - there are few passengers inside the modern corporate system.

 

TIME IS MONEY - Employee Value in some UK corporations

 

 

Broadband DSL penetration – April 2004.

 

 

USA                             4.8%

 

China                          5.1%

 

Germany                     8.4%

 

Finland                        11.8%

 

Belgium                       15.4%

 

South Korea                27.7%

From TIME Magazine 5 April 2004.

 

USA Property Survey for flexible space – 30th March 04.

 

On April 1st 2004 (no it’s not  a joke) The Wall Street Journal reported the results of a Gallup Poll commissioned by real-estate agents CoreNet Global, Atlanta, asking organisations their views on renting space up to 2010. There were 314 respondents:

 

40% say that 25% of their “knowledge-workers” will be teleworking.

 

Therefore the need for office space will decrease.

 

Of Nine factors affecting location decisions the ranking was:

 

50%+   Access to customers and markets

 

27%     Access to top specialised talent

 

20%     Better Quality of Life for employees

 

8%       Access to low paid workers (e.g. call centre staff in India, China etc)

 

This last factor flies in the face of the received wisdom which implied most organisations are low costs driven.

 

46% said they would pay a premium for “flexible space” in 2004.

67% said they thought they would pay such a premium in 2010.

 

60% said they will pay a premium for flexible lease terms in 2004.

65% said they expect that they will pay such a premium by 2010.

 

Error margin on the Poll results is 5.6% - WSJ Reporter SHEILA MUTO. 31Mar04.

 

Washington DC and Generic de-congestion – 10th March 04.

 

Council of Government (COG) surveys and targets in Washington DC provide the base for this table:

See NEWS report of 10th March 04 http://www.noelhodson.com/index_files/NEWS.htm

 

 

 

Spam on the Internet – 4th Feb 04.

 

Brightmail Logistics & Operations Center provided this analysis of unsolicited email offerings made across the Internet in December 2003:

 

Spam constitutes 58% of email traffic. The spammers advertised:

 

Products

                        21%

Adult

                        18%

Financial

                        18%

Scams

                        9%

Health

                        3%

Internet

                        6%

Leisure

                        6%

Fraud

                        3%

Spiritual

                        3%

Political

                        2%

Other

                        8%

Source – New Scientist 7th Feb 04. Brightmail Logistics & Operations Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who edits the Internet? – 29th Jan 04.

Time Magazine 2 Feb 04 analysed use of the main search engines and asks if major players might try to suppress their competitors, eventually editing what the public can find on the WEB:

 

ENGINES – percent of total searches

%

 

 

 

Use

2004.

2007.

p.a. profits

 

Google

 

Google lists 4 Billion WEB pages.

32%

$1B

 

$330M

Yahoo

Yahoo owns Inktomi, and via Overture, All the WEB, & AltaVista, - more than 3 Billion pages listed.

26%

 

 

 

AOL

 

19%

 

 

 

MSN Search

 

15%

 

 

 

Ask Jeeves

 

3%

 

 

 

Other

 

5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

550 million searches per day

100%

$2 B

$5.6B

 

Total  WEB

Est. 500 Billion Documents

 

 

 

 

 

Growth rate

 

35% p.a.

 

 

Amazon

In addition to its access to most FOR SALE books, Amazon has scanned 120,000 complete books ( x say 200 pages = 24M readable pages on-line).

 

 

Table drawn by Noel Hodson, SW2000 Telework Studies, from extracts from Time Magazine, 2nd Feb 04.

 

The concrete jungle – UK roads use 1% of the land – January 04.

 

Source – New Scientist “The Last Word”  contributors: Dave Dawson and Anne Worrell, Greater London Authority biodiversity manager; Biff Vernon, Management committee member of SABRE Society for all British Road Enthusiasts; Tim Lovell, Bristol, UK.

 

 

London - GLA

Roads

8.5%

Pavements

3.7%

Car Parks

5.1%

Gardens

19.3%

 

 

 

 

 

Whole of UK

Lengths

Widths

Percent

 

All Public Roads

425,121 km

 

 

 

Motorways

3,589 km

26 metres

 

 

A-Roads

56,696 km

12 metres

 

 

Incl. 7,921 km Dual Carriageways

18 metres

 

 

B-Roads

32,850 km

8 metres

 

 

C-Roads

89,686 km

 

 

 

Unclassified

242,300 km

 

 

 

 

425,121 km

= 2,200 sq km

 

 

All UK Area

 

= 241,590 sq km

= 0.9%

 

 

 

Include green verges

= 1.3%

Source SABRE

Department for Transport 2001

 

= 3,300 sq km

= 1.4%

Source DOT

 

Data from New Scientist – 24th January 2004.

 

 

 

 

 

USA Internet and Broadband report January 2004.

 

More Than One-Third of U.S. Internet Users Now Have Broadband

News Release, January 2004 – source Wendell Joice, ITAC director.

The numbers of adults who are online at home, in the office, at school, library or other location continue to grow at a modest rate. Broadband use is growing much more rapidly.

In research among 2,033 adults surveyed by telephone in November and December 2003,
Harris Interactive found that 69 percent of adults are now online, up from 67 percent in late 2002, 64 percent in late 2001, 63 percent in 2000 and 56 percent in 1999.

This growth in Internet penetration is a result of increased Internet access at both home and work. The proportion of adults who are now online at home has risen to 61 percent, up from 57 percent in 2002 and 52 percent in 2001. Those online at work have risen modestly to 31 percent from 28 percent in 2002 and 2001.

By far the most striking change in this new Harris Interactive research is the big increase in those with broadband connections. Less than two years ago, only 22 percent of adults online had broadband (including ISDN, cable, ADSL/DSC, T1 and T3 lines) connections. By November/December 2002, this had increased to 27 percent. It is now up to 37 percent, or more than one-third, of all those online.

As Internet penetration rises, the demographic profile of Internet users looks more like that of the nation as a whole. It is still true that more young than older people, and more affluent than low-income people, are online. But 7 percent of those online are now over 65 (compared to 15 percent of all adults who are over 65), 40 percent of those online (compared to 47 percent of all adults) did not go to college and 15 percent have incomes of less than $25,000 (compared to 19 percent of adults).

Wendell Joice [wjoice@erols.com]

 

USA Road Congestion report

 

Tim Lomax,

Texas Transportation Institute, Texas A&M University

Report by Associated Press 30 September 2003

Statistics tabled by Noel Hodson

 

Commuters’ Queuing Time p.a.

2001

In 8 hour work days.

Time & Fuel Costs

Gridlock was eased in:

2001 USA Average

26 hrs

3.25

$69.5B

 

Los Angeles

90 hrs

11.25

 

San Antonio, Texas

San Francisco - Oakland

68 hrs

8.50

 

Fresno, California

Denver

64 hrs

8.00

 

Pensacola, Florida

Miami

63 hrs

7.90

 

 

 

Chicago

61 hrs

7.60

 

 

 

Phoenix

61 hrs

7.60

 

 

 

San Jose, Calif.

60 hrs

7.50

 

 

 

Boston

58 hrs

7.25

 

 

 

Washington DC

58 hrs

7.25

 

 

 

Portland Oregon

58 hrs

7.25

 

 

 

Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood, Fla

57 hrs

7.10

 

 

 

Seattle-Everett

56 hrs

7.00

 

 

 

Atlanta

55 hrs

6.90

 

 

 

San Bernadino-Riverside

55 hrs

6.90

 

 

 

Houston

55 hrs

6.90

 

 

 

Detroit

54 hrs

6.75

 

 

 

Minneapolis/St.Paul

53 hrs

6.60

 

 

 

San Diego

51 hrs

6.40

 

 

 

Las Vegas

51 hrs

6.40

 

 

 

Dallas Fort Worth

51 hrs

6.40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Report contributed by Gil Gordon  http://www.gilgordon.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oxford Internet Institute, UK statistics issued 16th September 2003.

 

 

Extract by Noel Hodson from text (for contacts to OII see our NEWS page via Front Page above)

Sample aged 14+ was

2,030 people

Surveys

Dates 23 May to 28th June 03

2 Average access points.

Majority at Home & School

No Access, just 4% of UK population

Who uses the Internet?

            

What for? In order of use.

Qualifications GCSE etc - irrelevant

 2/5ths do not use the Net.

Indifferent not technophobic.

7% are proxy users. A friend does for them.

1 in 7 have no access and no friend with access.

11% has broadband internet access at home

All of the sample

59%   

Browsing

 

34% of UK is off-line. “It will take another generation before 9/10ths are on-line”

 

Schoolchildren

98%

email

 

 

 

 

Working age

67%

shopping

 

 

 

 

Retirees

22%

Music & Entertainment

WHERE

AGE

 

 

 

 

 

Library

88%

Pupils 14-22 yrs

98%

 

 

 

 

 

Internet Café

77%

Working Age

67%

 

 

 

 

 

Mobile

75%

Retired

22%

 

 

 

 

 

Friends House

68%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home

58%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work

47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School College

8%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS, contact Professor Richard Rose, who directed the survey (oxis@oii.ox.ac.uk)

 

Where Work Gets Done - chart from ComputerWorld – 8th September 2003

 

 

 

Where Work Gets Done
Research shows that employees who could be classified as off-site workers work from a variety of places other than home. Here’s the breakdown:

 

BASE: 2,057 adults working at companies with 500 or more employees

Source: American Business Collaboration, 2002 (Percentages add up to 99% due to rounding)

Published by

ComputerWorld

 

8th September 2003.

 

Remote Teleworkers

4%

 

 

Regular Teleworkers

7%

 

 

Mobile workers

12%

 

 

Customer Site Workers

12%

 

 

Ad Hoc Teleworkers

15%

 

 

On-Site Workers

49%

 

 

 

 

USA Office vacancy rates – sent from Gil Gordon 13th August 2003

 

Could these vacancy rates be partly due to teleworking? - editor

 

13 August 03

Empty Offices

Central Business District

Suburbs

13 August 03

Empty Offices

Central Business District

Suburbs

Atlanta GA

17.3%

25.7%

Midtown South NY

13.9%

N/A

Bellvue, WA

25.3%

16.4%

New Haven CT

20.2%

23.1%

Boston, MA

15%

26.5%

Northern NJ

N/A

17.3%

Brooklyn NY

11%

N/A

Northern VA

N/A

20.5%

Central NJ

N/A

22.4%

Oakland CA

19.9%

23.4%

Chicago IL

15.9%

24.9%

Ontario CA

N/A

11.5%

Contra Costa CA

N/A

16.4%

Orange County CA

20.1%

17.5%

Dallas TX

29.9%

25.4%

Orlando FL

14%

21.4%

Denver CO

18.5%

23%

Palm Beach FL

14.7%

18.1%

Detroit ML

24%

20.9%

Philadelphia PA

13.2%

19.2%

Downtown NY

13.3%

N/A

Phoenix AZ

19.8%

21.7%

Fairfield County   CT

17.2%

20.6%

Portland OR

15.4%

26%

Fort Lauderdale FL

22.7%

19.4%

San Francisco peninsula CA

N/A

27.4%

Hartford CT

21.5%

19.3%

San Francisco CA

20.3%

25.4%

Houston TX

19.5%

19.5%

Seattle WA

16.2%

19.4%

Long Island NY

n/a

15.2%

Silicon Valley CA

24.3%

28.9%

Los Angeles CA

19.6%

18.7%

Southern NH

N/A

22.3%

Los Angeles-North CA

n/a

19.6%

St. Louis MO

22.9%

18.5%

Los Angeles-South CA

N/A

19%

St. Petersburg Clearwater FL

N/A

16.6%

Los Angeles-Tri-Cities CA

N/A

16.5%

Suburban MD

N/A

15.4%

Los AngelesWest CA

N/A

18.1%

Tampa FL

16.8%

22.0%

Miami FL

17.4%

19.1%

Washington DC

7.5%

N/A

 

 

 

Westchester County NY

21.8%

17.4%

Source: Cushman & Wakefield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK – Road Usage measuring Lorries, Buses & Cars 

 

ROAD SPACE UTILISED - Basic data from Dept for Transport, page 7, Green Futures July/August 2003.

The most accurate common denominator for fuel consumed

is weight x miles – adjusted by time in transit.

Blue entries below can be altered to test different data. – this is an EXCEL interactive calc. Email for a copy

Email:noelhodson@btconnect.com

 

 

In Use at the same time

Safe spacing - Vehicle Lengths

Travelling for Hours per Day

Road Lanes consumed in a day

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lorries

430,000

80%

 

Hours

Lanes Miles

 

 

344,000

2

8.00

41,697

Length

40

Feet

80

MPH

 

Av Speed

 

 

shadow ft

18.00

 

 

 

 

 

MPG

 

Per Gallon

 

 

 

4.00

 

Lorry Fuel Burned in a day - Imperial Gallons

 

 

12,384,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buses

250,000

50%

 

Hours

Lanes Miles

(Source Social Trends)

125,000

2

8.00

 

12,121

Length

32

Feet

64

MPH

 

Av Speed

 

 

shadow ft

8.00

 

 

 

 

 

MPG

 

Per Gallon

 

 

 

2.00

 

Bus Fuel Burned in a day - Imperial Gallons

 

 

4,000,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cars

26,000,000

20%

 

Hours

Lanes Miles

 

 

5,200,000

3

1.50

66,477

Length

15

Feet

45

MPH

 

Av Speed

 

 

shadow ft

35.00

 

 

 

 

 

MPG

 

Per Gallon

 

 

 

25.00

 

Car Fuel Burned in a day - Imperial Gallons

 

 

10,920,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Project Planning Tools

 

 

 

 

 

Noel Hodson - Tel 00-44-(0)1865 760994

 

 

 

 

 

noelhodson@btconnect.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

European commuting in minutes

 

 

 

 

 

From AT&T Today. 7/16/03:

AT&T GLOBAL SURVEY PREDICTS SURGE IN TELECOMMUTING - [The Star-Ledger (N.J.), p. 36.] Telecommuting is expected to boom over the next two years, in part because employers are increasingly willing to pick up the costs, a survey commissioned by AT&T found. Some 54 percent of companies worldwide allow employees to work from home or other remote locations, according to the survey, which was conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit, the database-gathering division of The Economist magazine. That number is expected to rise to 80 percent by 2005, driven by network improvements and an increasing globalization of the work force. Only 13 percent of companies help foot the bill for an employee's data hook-ups at home, but the number is expected to more than double over the next two years, the survey found. Within AT&T itself, one-third of all managers telecommute at least once a week. Some 17 percent work full time from home.

From AT&T Today, 7/15/03:

AT&T ANNOUNCES *** GLOBAL SURVEY PREDICTS UPSURGE IN TELEWORK - Businesses will see a major growth in teleworking over the next two years, according to a new AT&T survey conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit. The survey indicates more than 80 percent of companies worldwide expect to have employees who telework or work remotely in the next two years, up from 54 percent today. And even though only 13 percent of companies offer financial and material help to teleworkers currently, that number will rise to about 32 percent in 2005. The top three drivers of the 26 percentage point jump in telework cited by the 237 senior executives surveyed by the Economist Intelligence Unit, the business information arm of The Economist magazine, are better network access from remote locations (62 percent), better communications facilities (62 percent) and globalization of business operations (48 percent).

24th June 03 - Telework Numbers Rise in the Valley

Employed Trade Worksites for Home Offices

PHOENIX, AZ (June 24, 2003)-Recent research conducted for Valley Metro on how employees commute across Maricopa County indicates that the popularity of telework continues to be on the rise.  Eleven percent (11%) of employed, non-home based residents in Maricopa County telework daily, which is up from eight percent (8%) in 2002. Telework is more feasible due to increases in personal computer ownership (85%). Most of those with PCs at home also have Internet access (92%).  One-third (33%) of all employees have access to a work computer from home, more than one-third (44%) of Valley residents have a high-speed connection, and nearly half (46%) of Valley residents have a room dedicated as a home office.

The 11 percent, or 150,100 commuters who telework on a daily basis save 1.4 million miles from being traveled and keep more than 38,000 pounds of pollution from being emitted into Valley skies each day.

Valley Metro Rideshare offers telework program assistance to employers in Maricopa County. This help includes telework orientations, policy development, and training. Call (602) 262-7433 for more information on setting up telework programs at organizations or for a complete copy of the study. -end- Susan Tierney, Marketing Coordinator & Telework Outreach, Valley Metro Rideshare, 302 N. 1st Ave. Ste. 700, Phoenix, AZ 85003 , (p)602.262.7433 , (f) 602.534.1939

Telework as a Tool for Business & Government Continuity:

 

An ITAC Research and Public Education Program

 

I.  Introduction

 

In 1999 the President of the United States declared 63 disasters. Organizations must create effective Business Continuity (BC) plans, also commonly referred to as Continuity of Operation Plans (COOP).

Telework increases business resiliency by decentralizing and dispersing employees across the state, the country, or the globe, thus reducing the threat associated with point events.

ITAC proposes to conduct a study on the use of telework and remote work as a Business Continuity strategy.    The research will be conducted in 2003 and published in the first quarter of 2004. 

 

III.  Research Focus

 

40% of small businesses that experience a disaster never reopen their doors2

 

Project Products

 

In addition to the wide spread media coverage that Telework America research receives, ITAC plans on making the results of the 2003 research more readily available to the private and public sector to promote the benefits and productivity opportunities of telework. There are two main products that will be developed from the research findings:

 

www.workingfromanywhere.org .

 

 

 

21% increase in teleworking by USA Federal employees

 

– Tuesday 11th February 2003 -  Statistics gathered from 77 US Government agencies in November 2002 show a 21% increase since November 2001 in teleworkers, taking the total to 90,010 or 5% of the total Federal Agencies workforce of 1.8M.  In line with laws and recommendations introduced over the past decade Federal employees are being enabled and encouraged to telework. 625,313 employees are now eligible to telework.  In the year 2002 14.4% of eligible employees teleworked. The US Office of Personnel Management (OPM) produced the statistics.  The announcement is posted at http://www.opm.gov/pressrel/2003/eb-telework.asp.

 

Table 2 – Agencies With Utilization Rates of 20% or Higher

 

Total Employees

Total Teleworkers

% of Total Employees who Telework

 Agency for International Development

2,100

1,300

61.9

 Office of Personnel Management

3,673

1,493

40.6

 Consumer Product Safety Commission

470

182

38.7

 Farm Credit Administration

273

98

35.9

 National Science Foundation

1,078

355

32.9

 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

5,582

1,768

31.7

 Department of Education

4,777

1,464

30.6

 National Endowment for the Humanities

171

52

30.4

 National Mediation Board

52

15

28.8

 Commodity Futures Trading Commission

529

147

27.8

 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

1,206

325

26.9

 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 

2,600

669

25.7

 National Endowment for the Arts

158

40

25.3

 Federal Communications Commission

2,063

514

24.9

 Environmental Protection Agency

18,077

4,423

24.5

 Department of the Treasury

149,373

33,594

22.5

 National Labor Relations Board

1955

438

22.4

 Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation

786

173

22.0

 General Services Administration

14,174

3,058

                       21.6

 Merit Systems Protection Board

227

49

21.6

 Total

209,324

50,157

 

 

 

USA - 2003

 

Telework Survey – Board of Trade, Greater Washington, Washington  DC

 

 

30 May 03

An On-line survey

180 Respondents

Table summary by SW2000 Telework Studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is your telework ?

Successful

Neutral

Unsuccessful

 

 

 

74%

23%

3%

 

100%

Program driven by?

Employee requests

Employer’s gain

 

 

 

 

69%

44%

 

 

 

Employer pays for?

Broadband

Computer

Printer

Phone line

 

 

44%

90%